Higher risk workplaces


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These regulations aim to protect those working in industries such as construction, waste and recycling and certain areas of manufacturing, as they may be at higher risk of accidents.

You can find all 15 regulations that relate to higher risk workplaces here [opens in new window].

You can find all the regulations that relate to Higher risk workplaces below to the left.

Agriculture (Metrication) Regulations 1981

These regulations amend agricultural legislation by substituting metric units for Imperial units.

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Agriculture (Safety, Health and Welfare Provisions) Act 1956 (Repeals and Modifications) Regulations 1975

These regulations are largely repealed except for provisions relating to the creation of offences, the conduct of inquests and the making of the Agriculture (Tractor Cabs) Regulations 1974.

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Agriculture (Tractor Cabs) (Amendment) Regulations 1990

These regulations impose requirements for new tractors to have an approved safety cab.

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Agriculture (Tractor Cabs) Regulations 1974

These regulations revoke and consolidate earlier legislation regarding the fitting of safety cabs to tractors.

Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007

These regulations impose duties on clients and contractors in relation to construction work.

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Construction (Head Protection) Regulations 1989

These regulations require that suitable head protection is provided to and worn by those working in construction.

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Diving at Work Regulations 1997

These regulations impose requirements and prohibitions on diving contractors.

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Docks Regulations 1988

These regulations impose health, safety and welfare requirements with respect to dock operations.

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Docks, Shipbuilding etc (Metrication) Regulations 1983

These regulations substitute metric units for imperial units.

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Freight Containers (Safety Convention) Regulations 1984

These Regulations require owners, lessees and others in control of freight containers used at work to comply with conditions of use.

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Health and Safety (Agriculture) (Miscellaneous Repeals and Modifications) Regulations 1976

The regulations are a consequence of the amendment of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 by the Employment Protection Act 1975 and transfer responsibility for farm safety to the HSE from MAFF (Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food) (or in Scotland, from the Secretary of State).

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Health and Safety (Foundries etc) (Metrication) Regulations 1981

These regulations have no effect as the provisions in the various regulations to which these regulations applied have been revoked.

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Loading and Unloading of Fishing Vessels Regulations 1988

These regulations are intended to ensure that fishing vessels have safe means of access and are safe places of work.

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Non-ferrous Metals (Melting and Founding) Regulations 1962

These regulations impose safety requirements on the casting of metals into moulds.

Notification of Conventional Tower Cranes (Amendment) Regulations 2010

These regulations amend the Notification of Conventional Tower Cranes Regulations 2010 to correct a drafting error.

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Notification of Conventional Tower Cranes Regulations 2010

These regulations require an employer to notify HSE of the erection of a conventional tower crane on a construction site within 14 days of its initial thorough examination.

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Prevention of Accidents to Children in Agriculture Regulations 1998

These Regulations prohibit the riding by a child on certain classes of vehicle or machine used in agricultural operations.

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Shipbuilding and Ship-repairing Regulations 1960

These regulations impose safety requirements in relation to shipbuilding and ship-repairing.

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Work in Compressed Air Regulations 1996

These Regulations impose requirements and prohibitions with respect to the health, safety and welfare of persons who work in compressed air.

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Tell us what you think should happen to these regulations and why, being specific where possible:

163 responses to Higher risk workplaces

  • David Watson said on July 19, 2011 at 7:31 am

    Whilst the CDM Regulations are fundamentally sound the accompanying Approved Code of Practice is too long and in many areas unclear, leading to misinterpretation especially by the over-zealous and ill-informed. This leads to bureaucracy especially in the areas of risk assessment and competence assessment. The ACoP needs to be simplified and its requirements clarified in a way that minimises the opportunity for misinterpretation. Much of what are currently ACoP clauses should only have guidance status.

    The expectations in respect of design risk management are particularly contentious, eg. what needs to documented, how far is far enough with respect to applying the principle of ‘so far as is reasonably practicable’, etc. These requirements need to be clarified.

    The other big burden on design organisations (and contractors) is having to complete the endless core competence questionnaires (CDM ACoP appendix 4 stage 1) despite having third party OHSAS18001 accreditation, CHAS accreditation, etc. Safety Schemes in Procurement (SSIP) and the new PAS91 standard appear to be doing little to alleviate this burden and more should be done through the CDM ACoP to address this issue.

    Comment Tags: CDM, construction

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