Dealing with hazardous chemicals and materials


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These regulations relate to those who work with hazardous materials in large quantities and in dangerous environments.

You can find all 40 regulations that relate to dealing with hazardous chemicals and materials here [opens in new window].

You can find all the regulations that relate to Dealing with hazardous chemicals and materials below to the left.

Anthrax Prevention Order 1971 etc (Revocation) Regulations 2005

This regulation revoked outdated legislation, of limited scope, containing provisions conflicting with EU and UK legislation.

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Biocidal Products (Amendment) Regulations 2003

These regulations provide for a general industry charge to enable HSE to recover full costs for work undertaken.

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Biocidal Products Regulations 2001

These regulations Implement EU single market requirements on marketing and use of biocidal products in Directive 98/8/EC.

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Biocidal Products (Amendment) Regulations 2005

These regulations amend HSE charging provisions that recover costs of work on biocidal products from industry.

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Biocidal Products (Amendment) Regulations 2007

These regulations amend the Biocidal Products Regulations 2001 to keep national law in line with EU single market requirements.

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Biocidal Products (Amendment) Regulations 2010

These regulations amend the Biocidal Products Regulations 2001 to keep national law in line with evolving EU single market requirements for biocidal products.

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Chemicals (Hazard Information and packaging for supply) Regulations 2009

These regulations implement European single market requirements on classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous chemicals.

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Compressed Acetylene (Importation) Regulations 1978

These regulations permit the importation of acetylene above a specified pressure provided that HSE has licensed the import.

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Compressed Acetylene Order 1947

This Order permits the use of acetylene at or below a specified pressure as authorised by HSE for manufacturing organic chemicals.

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Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006

These regulations place duties on those best placed to eliminate or reduce exposure to asbestos fibre from work activities and to protect public health

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Control of Industrial Air Pollution (Transfer of Powers of Enforcement) Regulations 1987

These regulations remove duties to control pollution under HSWA and place enforcement for environmental issues with
the SoS Environment.

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Control of Lead at Work Regulations 2002

These regulations impose duties on employers and the self employed to prevent or control the exposure of employees to lead.

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Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations 2003

These regulations amend the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations to implement paragraphs 2 to 4 of article 1 of Council Directive 1999/38/EC.

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Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations 2004

These regulations amend the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations to implement the provisions concerning chromium VI in cement contained in Directive 2003/53/EC.

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Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002

These regulations aim to protect employee health by preventing or controlling exposure to hazardous substances at work.

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Export and Import of Dangerous Chemicals Regulations 2008 SI 2008/2108 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2005/928/regulation/1/made

These regulation establish a Designated National Authority (HSE) and provides powers for national enforcement.

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Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998

These regulations require that the installation, maintenance and use of gas fittings in domestic and commercial premises is undertaken by a suitably qualified and registered installer and that landlords properly check and maintain gas fittings and appliances.

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Gas Safety (Management) Regulations 1996

These regulations provide for the preparation and acceptance of safety cases in respect of the conveyance of gas in a network and impose requirements in respect of gas escapes and the composition and pressure of gas.

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Gas Safety (Rights of Entry) Regulations 1996

These regulations confer rights of entry upon authorities to enter premises for the purpose of preventing gas escapes.

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Genetically Modified Organisms (Contained Use) (Amendment) Regulations 2002

1st of 3 amending regulations to the Genetically Modified Organisms (Contained Use) Regulations 2000 to allow information which has national security implications to be kept off the public register.

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Genetically Modified Organisms (Contained Use) (Amendment) Regulations 2005

2nd of 3 amending regulations to the Genetically Modified Organisms (Contained Use) Regulations 2000 to implement the provisions of Directive 2003/4/EC dealing with the rights to access environmental information but also amending containment levels and correcting some errors.

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Genetically Modified Organisms (Contained Use) Regulations 2000

These regulations impose safety requirements on activities involving the contained use of genetically modified organisms.

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The Genetically Modified Organisms (Contained Use) (Amendment) Regulations 2010

3rd of 3 amending regulations to the Genetically Modified Organisms (Contained Use) Regulations 2000 made in response to an EC opinion that UK had failed to properly transpose the Directive.

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Notification of Cooling Towers and Evaporative Condensers Regulations 1992

These regulations require controllers of cooling towers and evaporative condensers to notify local authorities of the device.

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Notification of Installations Handling Hazardous Substances (Amendment) Regulations 2002

These regulations amend the Notification of Installations Handling Hazardous Substances Regulations 1982 to prohibit the handling of ammonium nitrate and mixtures containing ammonium nitrate in a quantity equal to or exceeding the quantity specified in the schedule.

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Notification of Installations Handling Hazardous Substances Regulations 1982

These regulations prohibit any person from undertaking any activity which entails there being a notifiable quantity or more of a hazardous substance on any site unless that person has notified the Health and Safety Executive.

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Tell us what you think should happen to these regulations and why, being specific where possible:

75 responses to Dealing with hazardous chemicals and materials

  • Fred Forshaw said on July 22, 2011 at 9:43 am

    I m a black powder shooter of 45 years and obviously have always had a Police Explosives Licence. Recently I have had to apply to the HSE for a “Recipient Competent Authority Transfer Document ” as well as an Explosives Licence. This extra EU document consists of nothing more than a matrix of meaningless numbers. I am a Registered Firearms Dealer – I have no idea what this “Transfer Document” is, or what it means – neither do countless other dealers and black powder shooters that I have spoken to. The Recipient Competent Authority Transfer Document raises meaningless EU documentation to a truly stellar level. It achieves nothing, means nothing to those to whom it is issued, and is a good example of the UK gold-plating EU directives. This insane doument should not be applied to private indivduals’ use of black powder.

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