Biodiversity, wildlife management, landscape, countryside and recreation


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These regulations aim to conserve vulnerable or rare species, habitats and wildlife sites. They also control access to footpaths and national parks.

They include provisions on fishing activities; invasive non-native species; protection of native species; traps; trade in endangered species; zoo licensing; dangerous wild animals; game; selling dead wild birds; registering and ringing captive birds; wildfowling restrictions; national park authorities; common land; rights of way; areas of outstanding beauty; and pest control.

You can find all 163 regulations that relate to biodiversity, wildlife management, landscape, countryside and recreation below to the left.

The Rural Development (Enforcement) (England) Regulations 2007

Adopt legislative and administrative provisions to ensure that the Community’s financial interests in relation to expenditure on rural development are effectively protected.

EU regulation

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The Rural Development (Enforcement) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2010

Minor amendments to take account of changes to domestic and European legislation

EU regulation

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Control of Pollution (Anglers’ Lead Weights) (Amendment) Regulations 1993

This regulation amends the Control of Pollution (Anglers Lead Weight) Regulations 1986, the prohibition, set out in regulation 3 of the 1986 Regulations, on the importation of certain sizes of lead weghts is revoked by this regulation.

UK regulation

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Control of Pollution (Anglers’ Lead Weights) Regulations 1986

Regulations restricting the importation and supply of lead weights (of a certain weight) used for fishing activities.

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Coypus (Prohibition on Keeping) Order 1987

This Order is aimed at avoiding coypu (an invasive non-native species of animal) establishing in the wild in GB. It seeks to achieve this through prohibiting the keeping within GB of any Coypu.

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Small Ground Vermin Traps Order 1958

Certain traps specified in the 1958 Order as adapted solely for the destruction of rats, mice or other small ground vermin are excluded from the general spring traps sale and use prohibition, imposed by section 8 of the Pests Act 1954.

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Environmental Protection (Restriction on Use of Lead Shot) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2002, SI 2002/2102

These regulations amend the list of sites protected under the Lead Shot Regulations see Environment 029

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Environmental Protection (Restriction on Use of Lead Shot) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2003, SI 2003/2512

These regulations amend the list of sites protected under the Lead Shot Regulations see Environment 029

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Environmental Protection (Restriction on Use of Lead Shot) (England) Regulations 1999, SI 1999/2170

These regulations restrict the use of lead shot over wetlands and protected areas to protect wetland birds and their habitats from toxins

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Mink (Keeping) (Amendment) Regulations 1982

These regulations further amend the Mink (Keeping) Regulations 1975 (see ID 33) by increasing the fee for a licence, and adding a guard fence design option.

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Mink (Keeping) (Amendment) Regulations 1997

These regulations further amend the Mink (Keeping) Regulations 1975 (see ID 33) by increasing the fee for a licence, and extending fee charging to include special licences issued under section 8 of the Act

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Mink (Keeping) Regulations 1975

The Mink (Keeping) Regulations 1975 prescribe the manner in which American mink kept under licenses issued under section 3 of the Act (i.e. for fur farming and other purposes not covered by section 8 of the Act) are to be kept and prescribe the fee for such licences.

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Spring Traps Approval (Variation) (England) Order 2007

These Orders seek to ensure the humaneness of Spring Traps by only permitting those approved by the Secretary of State to be used and sold. This and the other Variation Orders (see Env 35 & 36) amend the Spring Traps Approval Order 1995 (see Env ?) by adding makes and models of trap to the list of currently approved spring traps.

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Spring Traps Approval (Variation) (England) Order 2009

These Orders seek to ensure the humaneness of Spring Traps by only permitting those approved by the Secretary of State to be used and sold. This and the other Variation Orders (see Env 34 & 36) amend the Spring Traps Approval Order 1995 (see Env ?) by adding makes and models of trap to the list of currently approved spring traps.

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Spring Traps Approval (Variation) (England) Order 2010

These Orders seek to ensure the humaneness of Spring Traps by only permitting those approved by the Secretary of State to be used and sold. This and the other Variation Orders (see Env 34 & 35) amend the Spring Traps Approval Order 1995 (see Env ?) by adding makes and models of trap to the list of currently approved spring traps.

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedule) Order1992

This SI amends schedule 9 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.Specific species which are protected under the Act, are listed in various schedules, which are reviewed from time to time and then amended via SI. (see also Env 68 – 80)

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SSSI Appeals Regulations 2009

These regulations set out the rules on appeals to the Secretary of State in relation to refusals of consents or management notices on Sites Of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs)

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SSSI Appeals (Amendments) Regulations 2010

Amendments to the 2009 Appeals Regulations to extend their coverage thus setting out the procedures for appeals to the Secretary of State against a stop notice on a Site of Special Scientific Interest

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Amendment) Regulations 1995

Part I of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (“the Act”) contains provisions for, amongst other matters, implementing Council Directive 79/409 EEC on the conservation of wild birds. These Regulations make amendments to Part I of the Act for the purposes of further implementing that Directive.

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Amendment) (England and Wales) Regulations 2004.

These Regulations amend Part 1 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (“the Act”), the definition of “wild bird” in section 27 of the Act now includes any species which is ordinarily resident in or is a visitor to the European Territory of any member State.

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The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010

The 2010 Regulations transpose Council Directive 92/43/EEC on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora (“the Habitats Directive”). Obligated to transpose. The regulations contain a wide range of measures aimed at conserving and protecting our rarest and most threatened habitat types and species.

EU regulation

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The Conservation of Habitats and Species (Amendment) Regulations 2011

These Regulations amend the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 as a consequence of the enactment of the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009 and the Marine Scotland Act 2010 which largely replace the marine licensing and consent controls previously exercised under Part 2 of the Food and Environment Act 1985, and (in relation to England, Scotland and Wales) the Coast Protection Act 1949.

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Control of Trade in Endangered Species (Enforcement) Regulations

Prescribes as offences actions which contravene the requirements of EU wildlife trade Regulations and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, together with associated provisions regarding powers of entry, forfeiture and penalties where such an offence has been committed.

International

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2005 No 1674 – Control of Trade in Endangered Species (Enforcement) (Amendment) Regulations 2005

Amendments to 1997 Regulations which prescribes as offences actions which contravene the requirements of EU wildlife trade Regulations and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, together with associated provisions regarding powers of entry, forfeiture and penalties where such an offence has been committed.

International

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Control of Trade in Endangered Species (Enforcement)(Amendment) Regulations 2007

Technical amendments to 1997 Regulations which prescribes as offences actions which contravene the requirements of EU wildlife trade Regulations and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, together with associated provisions regarding powers of entry, forfeiture and penalties where such an offence has been committed.

International

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2009 No 1773 – Control of Trade in Endangered Species (Enforcement)(Amendment) Regulations 2009

Technical amendments to 1997 Regulations which prescribes as offences actions which contravene the requirements of EU wildlife trade Regulations and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, together with associated provisions regarding powers of entry, forfeiture and penalties where such an offence has been committed.

International

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2009 No 496 – Control of Trade in Endangered Species (Fees) Regulations

This regulation sets out the fees for applications for licenses under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.

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1985 No 1154 – Control of trade in Endangered Species (Designation of Ports of Entry) Regulations

Lists the ports of entry and exit through which endangered species of fauna and flora, as listed on EU Regulations which transpose the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species, and their derivatives, can be imported or exported. The Regulations comply with a requirement EU Regulation 338/97 which requires EU Member States to list such ports.

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Zoo Licensing Act 1981 (Amendment) (England and Wales) Regulations 2002

Transposes the provisions of the EU Zoos Directive 1999/22/EC (on the licensing and inspection of zoos) which are not already covered by the Zoo Licensing Act 1981. The main change was to make it a legal requirement that zoos take part in conservation and education activities.

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The Dangerous Wild Animals Act 1976 (Modification) (No2) Order 2007

This Order substituted, in England and Wales, the Schedule to the Dangerous Wild Animals Act 1976 (“the Act”) which specifies the kinds of animals to which the provisions of the Act apply.

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The Legislative Reform (Dangerous Wild Animals)(Licensing) Order 2010 No 839

This Order modified provisions of the Dangerous Wild Animals Act 1976 which relate to the grant of licences to keep wild animals by extending the period of validity of a licence from a maximum of one year to two years and providing for licences to come into force immediately upon their grant rather than from either the date of grant or the beginning of the following year.

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The Regulatory Reform (Game) Order 2007

Various Game Acts dating back to the 1830′s regulate the exploitation of game birds and ground game (hares and rabbits). They include close seasons, shooting rights and poaching provisions. The Game Reform Order reduces regulatory burden by removing the requirement to hold certain licences in order to take, kill or deal in game. It also removes restrictions on dealing in game birds and venison during the close season.

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The Wildlife and Countryside (Registration to Sell etc. Certain Dead Wild Birds) (Amendment) Regulations 1991

These Regulations amend the Wildlife and Countryside (Registration to Sell etc. Certain Dead Wild Birds) Regulations 1982 (S.I. 1982/1219) (“the principal Regulations”).

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The Wildlife and Countryside (Registration and Ringing of Certain Captive Birds) (Amendment) (England) Regulations 2008

These Regulations amend the Wildlife and Countryside (Registration and Ringing of Certain Captive Birds) Regulations 1982 (S.I. 1982/1221) to provide that birds listed in the Schedule (peregrine falcon and merlin) may be registered in any register kept by the Secretary of State of birds for which a certificate is held of a kind referred to in Article 10 of EC Regulation No. 338/97 on the protection of species of wild fauna and flora by regulating trade therein.

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The Wildlife and Countryside (Registration and Ringing of Certain Captive Birds) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2004

These Regulations amend the Wildlife and Countryside (Registration and Ringing of Certain Captive Birds) Regulations 1982 so that registration no longer ceases every three years, requiring renewal, they also allow the Secretary of State to accept a marking of a bird in accordance with European Regulations implementing the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora as an alternative to a ring provided by the Secretary of State.

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The Wildlife and Countryside (Registration and Ringing of Certain Captive Birds) (Amendment) Regulations 1994

These Regulations are consequential on S.I. 1994/1151 and amend the Registration and Ringing Regulations to require every bird included in Schedule 4 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act to be ringed with a ring obtained from the Secretary of State.

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The Wildlife and Countryside (Registration and Ringing of Certain Captive Birds) (Amendment) Regulations 1991

These Regulations amend the Wildlife and Countryside (Registration and Ringing of Certain Captive Birds) Regulations 1982 (S.I. 1982/1221) and provides that a registration which was made before 1st April 1991 shall expire on 1st September 1993, and that any registration made on or after 1st April 1991 shall expire at the end of a period of three years from the date on which the registration was made.

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Wildlife and Countryside (Ringing of Certain Birds) Regulations 1982

These regulations ensure that captive bred birds on Schedule 3 of the Wildlife and Countryside ACt 1981 are correctly ringed in order to allow their sale.

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedule 9) (England and Wales) Order 2010

This SI amends schedule 9 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.
Schedule 9 prohibits the release into the wild of certain animals and planting or causing to grow of certain plants in order to prevent their establishment and subsequent they might cause. This schedule is updated from time to time by means of a ‘variation’ (see also Env 42, 68 – 80)

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedule 4) (England) Order 2008

This SI amends Schedule 4 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act. Specific species which are protected under the Act are listed in various schedules, which are reviewed from time to time and then amended via SI (see also ENV 42, 68-80).

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedule 5)(England) Order 2008

This SI amends schedule 5 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.
Specific species which are protected under the Act, are listed in various schedules, which are reviewed from time to time and then amended via SI. (see also Env 42, 68 – 80)

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedule 9) Order 1999

This SI amends schedule 9 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.
Schedule 9 prohibits the release into the wild of certain animals and planting or causing to grow of certain plants in order to prevent their establishment and subsequent they might cause. This schedule is updated from time to time by means of a ‘variation’ (see also Env 42, 68 – 80)

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedules 5 and 8) Order 1998

This SI amends schedules 5 and 8 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. Specific species which are protected under the Act, are listed in various schedules, which are reviewed from time to time and then amended via SI. (see also Env 42, 68 – 80)

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedule 9) Order 1997

This SI amends schedule 9 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.
Schedule 9 prohibits the release into the wild of certain animals and planting or causing to grow of certain plants in order to prevent their establishment and subsequent they might cause. This schedule is updated from time to time by means of a ‘variation’ (see also Env 42, 68 – 80)

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedule 4) Order 1994

This SI amends Schedule 4 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. Specific species which are protected under the Act, are listed in various schedules, which are reviewed from time to time and then amended via SI. (see also Env 42, 68 – 80)

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedules 2 and 3) Order 1992

This SI amends Schedules 2 and 3 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. Specific species which are protected under the Act are listed in various schedules, which are reviewed from time to time and then amended via SI. (see also ENV 42, 68-80).

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedule) (No. 2) Order 1992

This SI amends schedule 9 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.
Schedule 9 prohibits the release into the wild of certain animals and planting or causing to grow of certain plants in order to prevent their establishment and subsequent they might cause. This schedule is updated from time to time by means of a ‘variation’ (see also Env 42, 68 – 80)

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedules 5 and 8) Order 1992

This SI amends schedules 5 and 8 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. Specific species which are protected under the Act, are listed in various schedules, which are reviewed from time to time and then amended via SI. (see also Env 42, 68 – 80)

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedule) Order 1991

This SI amends schedule 5 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. Specific species which are protected under the Act, are listed in various schedules, which are reviewed from time to time and then amended via SI. (see also Env 42, 68 – 80)

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedule) Order 1989

This SI amends schedule 5 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. Specific species which are protected under the Act, are listed in various schedules, which are reviewed from time to time and then amended via SI. (see also Env 42, 68 – 80)

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedules) Order 1988

This SI amends schedule 9 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. Schedule 9 prohibits the release into the wild of certain animals and planting or causing to grow of certain plants in order to prevent their establishment and subsequent damage they might cause. This schedule is updated from time to time by means of a ‘variation’ (see also Env 42, 68 – 80)

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The Wild Birds (Sundays) Order 1955 N0. 1286 for Caernarfon, Carmarthen, Devon, Isle of Ely, Montgomery, Norfolk, Pembroke, York North and West Riding.

This Order restricts wildfowling on Sundays in certain counties.

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The Wild Birds (Sundays) Order 1956 N0. 1310 for Brecknock, Cardigan, Denbigh and Merioneth

This Order restricts wildfowling on Sundays in certain counties.

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The Wild Birds (Sundays) Order 1957 N0. 429 for Cornwall, Glamorgan and Somerset

This order restricts wildfowling on Sundays in certain counties.

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The Wild Birds (Sunday in Anglesey) Order 1963 N0. 1700

This order restricts the wildfowling on Sundays in certain counties.

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Grey Squirrels (Warfarin) Order 1973

This Order, which is made for the purposes of the Agriculture (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1972, section 19, specifies warfarin and the soluble salts of warfarin as poisons for use for the purpose of destroying grey squirrels and specifies the manner of their use. Section 19 of the Act provides a defence in proceedings for an offence against section 8(b) of the Protection of Animals Act 1911 (c. 27) (which restricts the placing on land of poison and poisoned substances) if it can be shown that the act alleged to constitute the offence was done for the purpose of destroying grey squirrels and that the poison used and the manner of its use were in compliance with the provisions of this order.

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Conservation of Seals (England) Order 1999

This order, made under the Conservation of Seals Act 1970, protects common and grey seals on the East coast of England in order to allow the common seal numbers to recover from the Phocine Distemper Virus (PDV) outbreaks of 1988 and 2002 which greatly reduced the common seal population on the east coast of England.

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The Coypus (Special Licence) (Fees) Regulations 1997

The Coypus (Prohibition on Keeping) Order 1987 (see Env 25) prohibits the keeping of coypu within GB other than under a special licence.

The 1997 Regulations prescribe the cost of a special licence to keep Coypus

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Grey Squirrels (Prohibition of Importation and Keeping) Order 1937

This Order, made under section 10 of the Destructive Imported Animals Act 1932, prohibits the importation into and keeping within GB of grey squirrels. This was in response to the known damage they were causing as they became established in the wild.They can be kept under special licences issued under section 8 of the Destructive Imported Animals Act 1932 to allow their keeping for exhibition, scientific research or other exceptional purposes.

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The Mink Keeping (Prohibition) (England) Order 2004

This Order prohibits the keeping within England of any American mink. Notwithstanding this prohibition, American mink can be kept under special licence for exhibition, scientific research or other exceptional purposes. Between Five and eight licences are issued every year, covering between 60 and 70 animals, 50 of which relate to one research establishment.

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Musk Rats (Prohibition of Importation and Keeping) Order 1933

This Order prohibits the keeping within GB of any musk rats. Notwithstanding this prohibition, musk rats can be kept under special licence for exhibition, scientific research or other exceptional purposes.

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Non-indigenous Rabbits (Prohibition of Importation and Keeping) Order 1954

This Order prohibits the importation into keeping within GB of any non European rabbits.

Notwithstanding this prohibition, non-indigenous rabbits can be kept under special licence for exhibition, scientific research or other exceptional purposes.

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South Downs National Park Authority Establishment) Order 2010

This Order establishes the South Downs National Park Authority for the area of the Park

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National Park Authorities (Amendment) (England) Order 2009

This Order amends the National Park Authorities (England) Order 1996 so as to amend the membership of the Northumberland National Park Authority.

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National Park and Broads Authorities (Model Code of Conduct) (England) Order 2001

The Order contains a model code of conduct as regards the conduct which is expected of members and co-opted members of National Park authorities in England, and the Broads authority.

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National Park Authorities (Levies) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 1996

The National Park Authorities (Levies) (England) Regulations 1996 (“the principal Regulations”) apply to the issue of levies by National Park authorities to meet their expenses in respect of financial years beginning on or after 1st April 1997.

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National Park Authorities (Levies) (England) Regulations 1996

These Regulations provide for the issue of levies by a National Park authority for a National Park in England.

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National Park Authorities (England) (Amendment) Order 1996

These Regulations correct an error in paragraph 10 of Schedule 7 to the National Park Authorities (England) Order 1996

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National Park Authorities (England) Order 1996

Under section 63 of the Environment Act 1995, the Secretary of State may by order establish for a National Park an authority, known as a National Park authority, to carry out in relation to that Park the functions conferred on such an authority by or under Part III of that Act.

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Dartmoor National Park (Restriction of Agricultural Operations) Order 1991

This Order applies section 42(2) of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (which imposes restrictions on agricultural operations) to an area, shown on the map referred to in this Order, of approximately 250 acres of moor or heath at Cator Common, Cator, Widecombe, in the county of Devon within the Dartmoor National Park.

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Highways, Crime Prevention etc.(Special Extinguishment and Special Diversion Orders) Regulations 2003

Sections 118B and 119B of the Highways Act 1980, inserted by Schedule 6 to the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000, make provision enabling orders to be made for stopping up (a “special extinguishment order”) and diversion (a “special diversion order”) of certain highways for the purposes of crime prevention or the protection of pupils or staff of schools. These Regulations prescribe the forms and notices, and make provision as to the procedure, for these orders

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Crime Prevention (Designated Areas) Order 2003

Sections 118B and 119B of the Highways Act 1980 (inserted by paragraphs 8 and 12 of Schedule 6 to the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000) enable a council (which is a highway authority), for the purposes of crime prevention, to make orders for the stopping up or diversion of certain highways within areas designated by the Secretary of State. This Order designates areas under section 118B(1)(a) of the 1980 Act.

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Removal of Obstructions from Highways (Notices etc.) (England) Regulations 2004

Sections 130A, 130B and 130C of the Highways Act 1980 (inserted by section 63 of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000) make provision for the removal of obstructions from highways. Regulation 2 and the Schedule to these Regulations prescribe the forms of notices required under these sections

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Crime Prevention (Designated Areas) (Amendment) Order 2004

Sections 118B and 119B of the Highways Act 1980 (inserted by paragraphs 8 and 12 of Schedule 6 to the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000) enable a council (which is a highway authority), for the purposes of crime prevention, to make orders for the stopping up or diversion of certain highways within areas designated by the Secretary of State. This Order designates areas under section 118B(1)(a) of the 1980 Act.

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Crime Prevention (Designated Areas) Order 2005

Sections 118B and 119B of the Highways Act 1980 (inserted by paragraphs 8 and 12 of Schedule 6 to the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000) enable a council (which is a highway authority), for the purposes of crime prevention, to make orders for the stopping up or diversion of certain highways within areas designated by the Secretary of State. This Order designates areas under section 118B(1)(a) of the 1980 Act.

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Crime Prevention (Designated Areas) (No. 3) Order 2005

Sections 118B and 119B of the Highways Act 1980 (inserted by paragraphs 8 and 12 of Schedule 6 to the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000) enable a council (which is a highway authority), for the purposes of crime prevention, to make orders for the stopping up or diversion of certain highways within areas designated by the Secretary of State. This Order designates areas under section 118B(1)(a) of the 1980 Act.

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Restricted Byways (Application and Consequential Amendment of Provisions) Regulations 2006

These Regulations are made under section 52 of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 (“the 2000 Act”). Section 52 enables the Secretary of State to make regulations providing for any existing legislation applying to highways, or to highways of a particular kind (such as footpaths or bridleways) to apply, or to be excluded from applying, to restricted byways or ways shown in a definitive map and statement (within the meaning of section 53(1) of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981) as restricted byways.

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Crime Prevention (Designated Areas) Order 2007

Sections 118B and 119B of the Highways Act 1980 (inserted by paragraphs 8 and 12 of Schedule 6 to the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000) enable a council (which is a highway authority), for the purposes of crime prevention, to make orders for the stopping up or diversion of certain highways within areas designated by the Secretary of State. This Order designates areas under section 118B(1)(a) of the 1980 Act.

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Works on Common Land (Exemptions) (England) Order 2007

This Order, which applies in relation to England only, prescribes exemptions to the prohibition in section 38(1) of the Commons Act 2006 on the carrying out, without the consent of the Secretary of State, of any restricted works on land to which that section applies.

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Works on Common Land, etc. (Procedure) (England) Regulations 2007

These Regulations, which apply in relation to England only, prescribe the procedure for applications to the Secretary of State under section 38 of the Commons Act 2006 for consent to carry out restricted works on common land, and certain related types of applications.

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Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (Establishment of Conservation Board) Order 2004

This Order, which is made under Part IV of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000, establishes the Conservation Board for the Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

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Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (Establishment of Conservation Board) Order 2004

This Order, which is made under Part IV of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000, establishes the Conservation Board for the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

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New Forest National Park Authority (Establishment) Order 2005

This Order establishes the New Forest National Park Authority (“the Authority”) for the area of the Park and specifies the time when the Authority becomes the local planning authority for the Park.

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Norfolk and Suffolk Broads Act 1988 (Alteration of Constitution of the Broads Authority) Order 2005

This Order amends the Norfolk and Suffolk Broads Act 1988 so as to reduce the membership of the Broads Authority (“the Authority”) from 35 to 21 members, and to make some consequential changes.

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National Park Authorities (England) Order 2006

This Order amends the National Park Authorities (England) Order 1996 (S.I. 1996/1243) so as to alter the number of members appointed to the National Park authorities for each of the National Parks in England other than Northumberland and the New Forest.

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National Park Authorities’ Traffic Orders (Procedure) (England) Regulations 2007

Section 72 of the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006 amends the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 by inserting sections 22BB and 22BC, which enable National Park authorities to make orders regulating traffic on byways open to all traffic, restricted byways, bridleways, footpaths and certain unsurfaced carriageways. These Regulations specify the procedures which National Park authorities in England must follow in order to make such orders.

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Commons (Deregistration and Exchange Orders) (Interim Arrangements) (England) Regulations 2007

These Regulations apply where the Secretary of State, or a person appointed by him, has granted an application under section 16 of the 2006 Act to deregister common land and has made an order under section 17 of the 2006 Act in consequence of the granting of that application. The Regulations require the commons registration authority to give effect to the order.

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Access to the Countryside (Maps in Draft Form) (England) Regulations 2001

Part I of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 establishes a new regime for access to the countryside. Under Part I maps prepared by the Countryside Agency (“the Agency”) will show registered common land and open country. These Regulations, which extend to England only, make provision for the preparation of and consultation on maps in draft form under this Part.

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Access to the Countryside (Provisional and Conclusive Maps) (England) Regulations 2002

The Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 established a new regime for access to the Countryside. Under Part I of that Act maps prepared by the Countryside Agency (“the Agency”) will show registered common land and open country. These Regulations, which extend to England only, make provision in respect of the publication of maps issued in provisional and conclusive form

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Access to the Countryside (Provisional and Conclusive Maps) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2003

These Regulations, which apply to England only, make certain minor amendments to the Access to the Countryside (Provisional and Conclusive Maps) (England) Regulations 2002

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Access to the Countryside (Correction of Provisional and Conclusive Maps) (England) Regulations 2003

The Access to the Countryside (Provisional and Conclusive Maps) (England) Regulations 2002 (S.I. 2002/1710, amended by S.I. 2003/32) made provision in respect of the publication of maps issued in provisional and conclusive form. These Regulations, which apply in relation to England only, make provision for the correction of provisional and conclusive maps in certain circumstances.

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Access to the Countryside (Dedication of Land) (England) Regulations 2003

Section 16 of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 enables persons to dedicate their land for the purposes of Part I of that Act, which establishes a new regime for access to the countryside. These Regulations, which apply in relation to England only, provide what steps are to be taken when land is dedicated under section 16.

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Access to the Countryside (Exclusions and Restrictions) (England) Regulations 2003

The Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 (“the Act”) creates a public right of access to certain types of land, subject to certain conditions. The Act also provides for the exclusion or restriction of this right in certain circumstances. These Regulations contain provisions relating to the exclusion or restriction of such right of access to land.

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Access to the Countryside (Means of Access, Appeals) (England) Regulations 2004

These Regulations provide for the period within which, and the manner in which, appeals under section 38(1) of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 are to be brought

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Access to the Countryside (Correction of Provisional and Conclusive Maps) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2005

These Regulations, which apply in relation to England only, amend the Access to the Countryside (Correction of Provisional and Conclusive Maps) (England) Regulations 2003

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Access to the Countryside (Exclusions and Restrictions) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2006

These Regulations provide that where an appeal has been made under section 30 of the 2000 Act against a decision of a relevant authority not to act in accordance with an application for a direction to exclude or restrict access for the purpose of fire prevention under section 25(1)(a) of that Act and the hearing of the appeal has been determined by the Secretary of State, she must ensure that a copy of the amended notice of appeal with her decision endorsed on it is made available for inspection on the Planning Inspectorate Executive Agency’s website for three months.

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Local Access Forums (England) Regulations 2007

These Regulations, which apply in relation to England only, revoke and re-enact with modifications the Local Access Forum (England) Regulations 2002.

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Access to the Countryside (Coastal Margin) (England) Order 2010

The Order sets out descriptions of land which are coastal margin for the purposes of Part 1 of the CROW Act

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Coastal Access Reports (Consideration and Modification Procedure) (England) Regulations 2010

These Regulations contain procedural provisions in connection with certain reports submitted by Natural England to the Secretary of State under section 51 of the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949 (c. 97). The reports in question are those submitted pursuant to the duty under section 296 of the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009 (c. 23), which relates to the provision of a long-distance route around the English coast and an associated margin of land which is accessible to the public.

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Commons Registration (Exempted Land) Regulations 1965

These Regulations prescribe 30th September 1966 as the last date for applying to the Minister of Land and Natural Resources for an order under section 11 of the Commons Registration Act 1965 exempting common land and town or village greens from registration under the Act. They also prescribe a form of application for such an order, and provide for information to be given to the public about applications for orders and their grant or refusal.

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Commons Registration (General) Regulations 1966

These regulations prescribe the form of the registers of common land or town or village greens to be maintained by commons registration authorities under the Commons Registration Act 1965. They also provide for the entering in registers of certain other information, and the procedure for amendment of the registers under section 13 of the 1965 Act. The regulations remain relevant in areas where Part 1 of the Commons Act 2006 has not yet been brought into force. Redundant provisions revoked in 2010.

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Commons Registration (Time Limits) Order 1966

This Order provides for registration under the Commons Registration Act 1965 to begin on 2nd January 1967 and end on 31st March 1970, but fixes 2nd January 1970 as the last date for making applications for registration.

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Commons Registration (Time Limits) (Amendment) Order 1970

This Order extends until 31st July 1970 the period for registrations under section 4 of the Commons Registration Act 1965 which, by virtue of the Commons Registration (Time Limits) Order 1966, was to have ended on 31st March 1970. It does not affect the last date for the submission of applications for registration under section 4, which was fixed by the 1966 Order at 2nd January 1970.

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Commons Registration (General) (Amendment) Regulations 1968

These Regulations amend the Commons Registration (General) Regulations 1966 by providing for applications to be made in appropriate cases by persons other than the owner of the relevant right or interest, and for the forms to be signed if necessary by an agent. Redundant provisions revoked in 2010.

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Commons Registration (Objections and Maps) Regulations 1968

These Regulations introduce new colouring and symbols for register map sheets which are taken into use after 30th June 1968. Redundant provisions revoked in 2010.

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Commons Registration (New Land) Regulations 1969

These Regulations provide for the inclusion, in the registers of common land and of town or village greens maintained under the Commons Registration Act 1965, of any land which becomes common land or a town or village green after 2nd January 1970, and for the registration of rights of common over such land and of claims to the ownership thereof.

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Commons Registration (Finality of Undisputed Registrations) Regulations 1970

By section 7 of the Commons Registration Act 1965, if no objection is made to a provisional registration of any land as common land or as a town or village green, or of rights of common over or a claim to ownership of such land, or if all objections (including conflicting registrations taking effect as objections) are withdrawn, the registration becomes final at the end of the period during which objections could have been made, or upon the withdrawal of the only or the last surviving objection, whichever is the later. These Regulations prescribe the manner in which a registration authority is to indicate in the register the fact that an undisputed registration has become final.

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Commons Registration (Disposal of Disputed Registration) Regulations 1972

Under sections 5 and 19 of the Commons Registration Act 1965, if objection is made to a provisional registration of any land as common land or as a town or village green, or of rights of common over or a claim to ownership of such land, or if one such registration conflicts with another, the matter must be referred to a Commons Commissioner.

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Commons Rules 1966

Prescribe the procedure for meeting of commoners to pass resolution under the Commons Act 1908 to control the turning out of entire animals (i.e. stallions, rams or bulls) on common land.

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Commons (Schemes) Regulations 1982

These regulations prescribe the form of the schemes which may be made by district councils and National Park authorities under the Commons Act 1899, and the form of notice of a council’s intention to make schemes. The aim of these schemes is to make provision for the regulation and management of common land. Under them councils may improve the condition of commons and make byelaws to prevent nuisances and preserve order.

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Greater London Parks and Open Spaces Order 1967

Confers powers on London borough councils to use common land for certain recreational purposes.

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Operations in Areas of Archaeological Importance Regulations 1984

These regulations require a National Park authority to undertake a number of steps in realtion to an operations notice issued upon it under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979.

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Removal and Disposal of Vehicle Regulations 1986

A National Park Authority is the local authority in relation to the removal of abandoned vehicles

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National Parks and Access to the Countryside (Amendment) Regulations  1963

Regulations made revisions to the 1950 regulations.

 UK regulation

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National Parks and Access to the Countryside Regulations  1950

Requirement for county councils to survey and map public rights of way. Regulations required authorities to prepare the draft map on a scale of not les than 2 1/2 inches to the mile.

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Removal of Obstructions from Highways (Notices etc.) (England) Regulations 2004

Sections 130A, 130B and 130C of the Highways Act 1980 (inserted by section 63 of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000) make provision for the removal of obstructions from highways. These regulations prescribe the forms of notices required.

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Highways (SSSI Diversion Orders) (England) Regulations 2007

Sections 119D and 119E of the Highways Act 1980, inserted by Schedule 6 to the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000, make provision enabling an order (an “SSSI diversion order”) to be made for the diversion of certain highways to prevent significant damage to the special features of a site of special scientific interest. These Regulations prescribe the forms and notices, and make provision as to the procedure, for SSSI diversion orders

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Crime Prevention (Designated Areas) Order 2004

Sections 118B and 119B of the Highways Act 1980 (inserted by paragraphs 8 and 12 of Schedule 6 to the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000) enable a council (which is a highway authority), for the purposes of crime prevention, to make orders for the stopping up or diversion of certain highways within areas designated by the Secretary of State. This Order designates areas under section 118B(1)(a) of the 1980 Act.

 UK regulation

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Set-Aside Regulations 1988

The Regulations, which apply to Great Britain, provide for payment of aid to farmers who undertake for a period of five years (“the set-aside period”) to withdraw from agricultural production an area of land equal in size to at least 20 per cent of the area of land on the holding used in the reference period for producing relevant arable crops. Applications will not be accepted for aid from any person in relation to land in a national park unless that person has made prior notification of the intention to make an application.

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Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Regulations 1990

These Regulations make procedural provision for applications for listed building consent, for conservation area consent, for the variation or discharge of conditions attached to listed building consents or conservation area consents, and for appeals in respect of these matters. Regulations describe the procedures under which applications can be made and handled by the National Park Authority

 UK regulation

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Town and Country Planning General Regulations 1992

These Regulations supersede the Town and Country Planning General Regulations 1976. The regulations cover the handling of claims relating to compensation by a national park auhtority.

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Town and Country Planning General (Amendment) Regulations 1992

These Regulations amend the Town and Country Planning General Regulations 1992.

 UK regulation

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Town and Country Planning (Public Path Orders) Regulations 1993

These Regulations re-enact the Town and Country Planning (Public Path Orders) Regulations 1983 with minor and drafting amendments. They prescribe requirements for orders made by local planning authorities under section 257(1) or 258 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990.

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Public Path Orders Regulations 1993

These Regulations re-enact the Public Path Orders and Extinguishment of Public Right of Way Orders Regulations 1983 with minor and drafting amendments.

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Wildlife and Countryside (Definitive Maps and Statements) Regulations 1993

These Regulations re-enact the Wildlife and Countryside (Definitive Maps and Statements) Regulations 1983 with minor and drafting amendments.

 UK regulation

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Commons Registration (Disposal of Disputed Registrations) (Amendment) Regulations 1993

These Regulations amend the Commons Registration (Disposal of Disputed Registrations) Regulations 1972, which provided for the indication of the disposal of disputed registrations in the registers maintained under the Commons Registration Act 1965. They prescribe a new model entry on the register so that when a registration has become final with modifications that fact may be indicated by an entry setting out the registration in its modified form.

 UK regulation

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Local Authorities (Recovery of Costs for Public Path Orders) Regulations 1993

These Regulations make provision for county councils, district councils, London borough councils, the Common Council of the City of London, the Council of the Isles of Scilly, joint or special planning boards and the Broads Authority to impose charges for dealing with requests to make certain orders

 UK regulation

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Rail Crossing Extinguishment and Diversion Orders Regulations 1993

These Regulations prescribe requirements for the making of rail crossing extinguish ment orders and rail crossing diversion orders under sections 118A and 119A of the Highways Act 1980 as inserted by the Transport and Works Act 1992.

 UK regulation

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Conservation (Natural Habitats) Regulations 1994

These Regulations make provision for implementing Council Directive 92/43/EEC on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora. A national park authority has to have regard to the requirements of the Directive.

EU regulation

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Town and Country Planning (General Development Procedure) Order 1995

This Order consolidates with amendments the procedural provisions of the Town and Country Planning General Development Order 1988 and subsequent amending instruments

 UK regulation

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Crime Prevention (Designated Areas) Order 2003

Sections 118B and 119B of the Highways Act 1980 (inserted by paragraphs 8 and 12 of Schedule 6 to the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000) enable a council (which is a highway authority), for the purposes of crime prevention, to make orders for the stopping up or diversion of certain highways within areas designated by the Secretary of State. This Order designates areas under section 118B(1)(a) of the 1980 Act.

 UK regulation

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Public Rights of Way (Register of Applications under section 53(5) of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981) (England) Regulations 2005

Section 53(5) of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981enables any person to apply to a surveying authority for an order to modify the definitive map and statement concerning public rights of way. Section 53B(1) of the Act requires every surveying authority to keep a register of applications. These Regulations prescribe the information to be contained in that register and the manner in which that register is to be kept.

 UK regulation

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Crime Prevention (Designated Areas) Order 2005

Sections 118B and 119B of the Highways Act 1980 (inserted by paragraphs 8 and 12 of Schedule 6 to the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000) enable a council (which is a highway authority), for the purposes of crime prevention, to make orders for the stopping up or diversion of certain highways within areas designated by the Secretary of State. This Order designates areas under section 118B(1)(a) of the 1980 Act.

 UK regulation

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Crime Prevention (Designated Areas) (No. 2) Order 2005

Sections 118B and 119B of the Highways Act 1980 (inserted by paragraphs 8 and 12 of Schedule 6 to the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000) enable a council (which is a highway authority), for the purposes of crime prevention, to make orders for the stopping up or diversion of certain highways within areas designated by the Secretary of State. This Order designates areas under section 118B(1)(a) of the 1980 Act.

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Restricted Byways (Application and Consequential Amendment of Provisions) Regulations 2006

These Regulations are made under section 52 of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 (“the 2000 Act”). Section 52 enables the Secretary of State to make regulations providing for any existing legislation applying to highways, or to highways of a particular kind (such as footpaths or bridleways) to apply, or to be excluded from applying, to restricted byways or ways shown in a definitive map and statement (within the meaning of section 53(1) of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981) as restricted byways. It also includes power to make amendments which are consequential upon either the coming into force of sections 47 to 50 of the 2000 Act or the application of existing legislation to restricted byways.

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Commons (Severance of Rights) (England) Order 2006

Section 9 of the Commons Act 2006, which is deemed, by section 9(7) of that Act, to have come into force on 28th June 2005, prevents, subject to exceptions, the severance of a right of common from the land to which it is attached. This Order permits the temporary severance of a right of common to graze animals from the land to which the right is attached by enabling the leasing or licensing of the right to a third party for no more than two years (article 2(1)(a)) or by a lease or licence of the land without the right (article 2(1)(b)).

 UK regulation

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Crime Prevention (Designated Areas) Order 2006

Sections 118B and 119B of the Highways Act 1980 (inserted by paragraphs 8 and 12 of Schedule 6 to the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000) enable a council (which is a highway authority), for the purposes of crime prevention, to make orders for the stopping up or diversion of certain highways within areas designated by the Secretary of State. This Order designates areas under section 118B(1)(a) of the 1980 Act.

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Dedicated Highways (Registers under Section 31A of the Highways Act 1980) (England) Regulations 2007

Section 31A(1) of the Highways Act 1980 requires the appropriate council, as defined in section 31(7) of the 1980 Act, to keep a register containing information relating to maps and statements deposited and declarations lodged with that council, under section 31(6) of the 1980 Act, relating to dedicated highways. These Regulations, which apply only in relation to England, make provision for the information which is to be included in a registerand for the manner in which the register is to be kept.

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Rights of Way (Hearings and Inquiries Procedure) (England) Rules 2007

These Rules set out the procedures for hearings and inquiries afforded or caused to be held by the Secretary of State in connection with the confirmation, or modification and confirmation, of certain disputed orders (“rights of way orders”) made by certain local authorities, relating to the creation of footpaths, bridleways and restricted byways, the modification of the definitive map and statement (relating to certain public rights of way), and the stopping up, diversion or extinguishment of footpaths, bridleways and restricted byways.

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National Park Authorities’ Traffic Orders (Procedure) (England) Regulations 2007

Section 72 of the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006 amends the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 by inserting sections 22BB and 22BC, which enable National Park authorities to make orders regulating traffic on byways open to all traffic, restricted byways, bridleways, footpaths and certain unsurfaced carriageways. These Regulations specify the procedures which National Park authorities in England must follow in order to make such orders.

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Deregistration and Exchange of Common Land and Greens (Procedure) (England) Regulations 2007

These Regulations, which apply in relation to England only, prescribe the procedure for applications to the Secretary of State under section 16 of the Commons Act 2006 for the deregistration, or the deregistration and exchange, of areas of registered common land.

 UK regulation

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Commons (Registration of Town or Village Greens) (Interim Arrangements) (England) Regulations 2007

Regulations enable registration authorities to register land, which meets the criteria for registration set out in section 15(1) or 15(8) of the 2006 Act, in the register of town or village greens maintained pursuant to the Commons Registration Act 1965.

 UK regulation

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Commons Registration (England) Regulations 2008

These Regulations make provision about the registration of common land and town or village greens under Part 1 of the Commons Act 2006

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Dartmoor Commons (Authorised Severance) Order 2008

This Order provides that the Dartmoor Commoners Council is to be regarded as a commons council for the purposes of paragraph 1 (severance by transfer to public bodies) of Schedule 1 to the 2006 Act.

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Public Rights of Way (Combined Orders) (England) Regulations 2008

These Regulations apply section 53A of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (c. 69) to the types of Order listed in regulation 3. Those Orders are made by local authorities for the purpose of creating, stopping up or diverting public rights of way, and by virtue of section 53A’s now applying to them may also provide for the required consequential modification of the definitive maps and statements which record such rights of way. Before the coming into force of these Regulations, the required modifications to the definitive maps and statements could only be effected by means of a separate modification Order.

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Commons Registration (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2009

These Regulations amend the Commons Registration (England) Regulations 2008

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Commons Councils (Standard Constitution) (England) Regulations 2010

Regulations prescribe (as required by section 29(1) of the Commons Act 2006 (c. 26)) a standard constitution for commons councils established by orders under section 26(1) of that Act

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Public Rights of Way (Combined Orders) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2010

These Regulations amend the Public Rights of Way (Combined Orders) (England) Regulations 2008

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Commons Registration (Amendment and Miscellaneous Revocations) Regulations 2010

These Regulations revoke with effect from 30th November 2010 several instruments which relate to provisional registration under the Commons Registration Act 1965

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The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedule 4) (Wales) Order 2009

Article 3 of this Order removes the birds listed in that article from Schedule 4 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. It also removes the reference to hybrids so that Schedule 4 no longer includes hybrids of the species of birds in the list.

 UK regulation

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The Conservation (Natural Habitats, &c.) (Amendment) Regulations 2007

These regulations – amend the Conservation of Seals Act 1970, Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and CROW Act 2000 in order to better transpose the Council Directive 92/43/EEC on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora (“the Habitats Directive”).

EU regulation

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Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006

Act including making provision about bodies concerned with the natural environment and rural communities; wildlife, sites of special scientific interest, National Parks, Inland Waterways Amenity Advisory Council

 UK regulation

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Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000

Act making provisions on public access to the countryside, landscape designations, nature conservation and the protection of wildlife

 UK regulation

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Wildlife and Countryside (Amendment) Act 1991

An Act to amend sections 5 and 11 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 so as to make it an offence knowingly to cause or permit to be done certain acts mentioned in those sections.

 UK regulation

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Wildlife and Countryside (Amendment) Act 1985

This Act makes amendments to a number of provisions in the 1981 Wildlfe and Countryside Act

 UK regulation

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Spring Traps Approval Order 1995

By virtue of section 8 of the Pests Act 1954 it is an offence to use in England and Wales for the purposes of killing or taking animals a spring trap other than one approved by an Order of the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and the Secretary of State. This order lists those makes and models of approved traps and their conditions of use. This list has been added to by virtue of three Spring Traps Variation Orders (see ID 34-36)

 UK regulation

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Mink (Keeping) (Amendment) Regulations 1977

These regulations further amend the Mink (Keeping) Regulations 1975 (see ID 33) by increasing the fee for a licence

 UK regulation

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Mink (Keeping) (Amendment) Regulations 1979

These regulations further amend the Mink (Keeping) Regulations 1975 (see ID 33) by increasing the fee for a licence

 UK regulation

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Mink (Keeping) (Amendment) Regulations 1987

These regulations further amend the Mink (Keeping) Regulations 1975 (see ID 33) by increasing the fee for a licence

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Regulatory Reform (Deer) (England and Wales) Order 2007

This Order is made under section 1 of the Regulatory Reform Act 2001 (2001 c. 6). It amends the Deer Act 1991 (1991 c. 54) (“the 1991 Act”) by removing certain burdens on those affected by it.

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Tell us what you think should happen to these regulations and why, being specific where possible:

For example, you might consider whether the different Spring Traps Approval Orders could be replaced with one single piece of legislation to streamline and simplify requirements.

1,810 responses to Biodiversity, wildlife management, landscape, countryside and recreation

  • Hazel Gordon said on April 19, 2012 at 2:07 pm

    After spending the last 6 months writing a dissertation on the future of CROW, I strongly believe that the statute cannot be repealed without replacement. Preferably CROW should be replaced with a statute modelled upon the LRSA. CROW was a landmark statute in a long campaign to ensure access to the countryside for all, not merely landowners or those lucky enough to be permitted access. The LRSA provides a workable option for reform, and I believe that it not only remedies the current faults of CROW, it will extend the provision of access whilst ensuring the protection of the environment and landowners livelihood. Ultimately, CROW should be built upon, I have studied the faults and inequalities of the statute, but these do not justify repeal. To remove CROW from the statute books would return the law to a system based upon voluntary agreements to ensure access (the NCAPA) and it is evident from the failure of past legislation, that this is not an option.

    Comment Tags: CRoWA

  • Margaret Bradshaw said on February 26, 2012 at 6:52 pm

    As regards the natural envorinment and public access to it, I think RED TAPE CHALLENGE is a waste of time and money. Instead the Governement should be implementing the recommendations of the Natural England Stakeholder Working Group, whose report covers what need to be done.

    Comment Tags: CRoWA

  • Dave Allum said on January 6, 2012 at 11:11 pm

    Please keep CRoWA unaltered.

    Or even better, if this government would like to simplify legislation, then follow the Scottish model, which work in presumes access on pretty much every piece of green land that is not somebody’s private garden. Now that, would serve both the needs of the government favouring radical deregulation, and open up even more land to fellow walkers like myself. It works in Scotland with certain provisions made for the deer-stalking and grouse shooting season, so surely there must be no reason to suppose it would be unworkable south of the border?

    Comment Tags: CRoWA

  • Cathleen said on December 28, 2011 at 2:54 pm

    CRoWA – the right to roam is a valuable piece of legislation which was hard faught for I would like to see kept intact. This is a beautiful country and the right to enjoy it all is important. The rights offered by CRoWA should be preserved as a minimum.

    Comment Tags: CRoWA

  • Vince Grealy said on December 15, 2011 at 9:36 am

    I believe that it is very important that the environment is protected and that public access to it is enshrined in law. The Countryside Rights of Way Act made a significant and strategic step in this domain, and removing it would be a substantial retrograde step, particularly with the current need to promote healthy living and fight obesity. If it is to be changed, it should be strengthened to include the sort of thing recommended by the Natural England Working Group looking at unrecorded public rights of way.

    Comment Tags: CRoWA

  • Kate Fuller said on December 11, 2011 at 12:37 pm

    I do not believe that the successful conservation of species and habitats into the future, or continued access to footpaths/open access land and protection of landscape through the creation and evolution of national parks would be as guaranteed if the regulations which relate to these were removed from UK legislation. I believe that scrapping existing regulations with the view of duplicating aspects of their purpose through non-regulatory mechanisms (eg voluntary codes for society, business and land owners to follow) is a far less powerful and effective tool than having legislation in place. A voluntary code is just that – voluntary, there is no guarantee that a majority will act with the longer term in mind or in an environmentally responsible manner.
    I do agree that it is necessary to review regulations to ensure their relevance and workability. If regulations can be grouped together to make them easier to adhere to or enforce, without detracting from any continually desired purpose, this can only be a positive way to reduce any apparent bureaucracy. Whilst any voluntary code would give extra power to the electorate (whether this is good or bad will always be subjective), it is essential that the government has a longer term strategic mind set, which I think can only be achieved through regulation. Perhaps any new voluntary code should come in alongside legislation?
    As documented in the 2011 UK National Ecosystem Assessment, it will be increasingly important to protect biodiversity into the future, as this is a building block of how the natural environment provides current and future societal and economic prosperity related benefits within the UK and beyond. Alongside strong regulatory power, the UK government has a responsibility to educate within and beyond its borders why biodiversity is of value to us now and in the future, and promote what individuals and governments can do to ensure this. If legislation is reformed it must not be watered down, or allowed to create loop-holes which remove the access to the countryside (eg CRoWA was a long awaited Act which protects this access), or damage the positive work done to conserve biodiversity, habitat and species or undermine the founding principles of the national parks.

  • Boris Eremin said on December 8, 2011 at 1:09 pm

    By no means should environmental legislation be weakened or scrapped. Namely because natural capital and biodiversity cannot simply be rebought at a later date. The CRoWA lets citizens enjoy the beauty of the British countryside. Duke of Edinburgh walks would suffer, and there is nothing better than hiking through the Cairngorms or Snowdonia with your friends. While I am sure there is scope for streamlining, I do not believe anything should be removed. Legislation is not passed without reason.

  • John Tyas said on September 20, 2011 at 9:22 pm

    This legislation can be improved by leaving well alone!!

    As fell walkers my wife & I spend many days walking the countryside and mountains and are well aware that some landowners will do what they can to prevent access over their land.

    Rights to access areas of land have been hard fought for and would be a crime to discard now.

    Voluntary codes are useless – and not worth the paper they are written on.

    The countries walkers do not want to have to mass trespass again.

    CroWA – IS NOT RED TAPE (sorry to shout) is supports our human rights.

    If you are a truly ‘green’ government you will maintain the peoples right to roam.

    Comment Tags: CRoWA, fell walking, ramblers

  • Jonathan Coyle said on September 11, 2011 at 4:35 pm

    The CRoWA matters, walkers should not lose the right to roam.

    Comment Tags: CRoWA

  • David Veryard said on September 11, 2011 at 11:20 am

    This is an important piece of legislation. It should not be weakened in any way.

    Comment Tags: CRoWA

  • Colin John said on September 6, 2011 at 8:27 am

    The CRoWA specifies “excepted land”; this includes land within 20 metres of a dwelling. The Act should be modified to extend this provision to include ALL rights of way. A right of way that passes through a drive, home and garden is a gross intrusion on security and the right to privacy. I have such a right of way and my experience is that I have had dogs roam in my garden, people wandering across my garden looking into my house, I cannot leave my grandchildren in the garden unattended.

    Comment Tags: CRoWA

    • Cal said on January 31, 2012 at 8:36 pm

      In response to the above with some experience on Access and PRoW.

      Comment Tags: CRoWA, footpaths, PROW

  • Aaron Bowdery said on September 5, 2011 at 2:45 pm

    The fact that the government put the laws just simply as red tape in the first place is slightly distressing. The environment for people and wildlife is extremely important and is defiantly not just “red tape” anyway! That they have even considered getting rid of the laws is infuriating and absolutely a no go. I speak as someone who does not get to experience the wonderful experiences of nature on our coastlines, countryside’s, riverbanks and lakes, and I find that this is a crucial, in fact the ONLY part that is keeping our wildlife together, without these laws Britain’s natural places and happiness going to fall apart.
    Do not remove the protection, do not remove the laws and do not remove our native wildlife from the world. I hope the Government realises how much of a mistake they have made by even considering this, because it is a no go.

  • Sam Harrison said on September 1, 2011 at 7:00 pm

    The fact that the government is even contemplating scrapping acts such as the Countryside & Rights of Way Act 2000 and the Natural Environment & Rural Communities Act 2006 shows either complete ignorance on their behalf as to what these acts are actually in place for, or complete contempt of our natural environment.

    Time and time again the government claims to be the “greenest ever”, and time and time again their actions tell a different tale. It’s a complete farce.

    Comment Tags: CRoWA

  • Paula Jones said on August 21, 2011 at 9:43 am

    The Ramblers Association has fought long and hard to secure this valuable piece of legislation. CRoWA ensures that everyone has access to our countryside and that public footpaths and habitat are protected from over-development or inappropriate, detrimental use. This Act also ensures that local authorities and other bodies (Countryside Council for Wales) maintain and preserve footpaths under RoWIP (Rights of Way Improvement Plan) and land such as that designated as AONB.
    Woodlands in England and Wales very nearly became the preserve of private landlords. Don’t let this legislation disappear and with it the right to prevent greedy landowners from blocking paths or preventing public access by other means.

  • Anne Hanson said on August 18, 2011 at 1:27 pm

    Leave the legislation alone. This was fought for and is highly valued.

    Comment Tags: CRoWA

  • Andrew Morgan said on August 17, 2011 at 3:48 pm

    CRoWA – the right to roam is a very valuable piece of legislation which I would like to see kept intact. This is a fantastic country and the right to enjoy it all is very important. The rights offered by CRoWA should be preserved as a minimum – increased as a preference

    Comment Tags: CRoWA

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