Managing staff


This cross-cutting theme is now closed for comments.

You can read comments made since the start of the Red Tape Challenge in April 2011 below.

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These regulations are designed to protect the employee in the workplace, through rules on areas including working time, statutory annual leave, sick pay and disability adjustments.

You can find the regulations that relate to managing staff below to the left.

Conduct of Employment Agencies and Employment Businesses Regulations 2003

Legislation ensures the regulation of employment agencies and businesses.

 UK regulation

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Employment Agencies Act 1973 (Exemption) (No 2) Regulations 1979

These Regulations exempt certain named organisations from the licensing and other provisions of the Employment Agencies Act 1973

 UK regulation

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Employment Agencies Act 1973 (Exemption) (No 2) Regulations 1984

As above, this regulation amends specific exclusions to the Act.

 UK regulation

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Employment Agencies Act 1973 (Exemption) Regulations 1976

As above, this regulation amends specific exclusions to the Act.

 UK regulation

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Additional Paternity Leave (Adoptions from Overseas) Regulations 2010

These regulations set out the statutory entitlements to additional paternity leave when a child is adopted from overseas and the processes which employers and employees must follow.

 UK regulation

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Additional Paternity Leave Regulations 2010

These regulations set out the statutory entitlements to additional paternity leave and the processes which employers and employees must follow.

 UK regulation

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Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (Adoptions from Overseas) Regulations 2010

These regulations set out details such as the eligibility requirements and notice an employee must give in order to receive Additional Statutory Paternity Pay when adopting a child from overseas.

 UK regulation

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Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (Birth, Adoption and Adoptions from Overseas) (Administration) Regulations 2010

These regulations set out how employers can reclaim amounts of Additional Statutory Paternity Pay which they have paid to their employees.

 UK regulation

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Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (General) Regulations 2010

These regulations set out details such as the eligibility requirements and notice an employee must give in order to receive Additional Statutory Paternity Pay.

 UK regulation

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Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (National Health Service Employees) Regulations 2010

These regulations set out cases in which employment with more than one NHS trust may be treated as a single contract for the purposes of Additional Statutory Paternity Pay.

 UK regulation

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Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (Weekly Rates) Regulations 2010

These regulations set out the weekly rate of Additional Statutory Paternity Pay.

 UK regulation

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Companies Cross-Border (Mergers) Regulations 2007

The Regulations provide a framework whereby companies may engage in a cross-border merger

 EU regulation

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Data Protection (Processing of Sensitive Personal Data) Order 2000

This regulation determines the specific circumstances in which the processing of sensitive personal data can be carried out.

 EU regulation

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Employers’ Liability (Compulsory Insurance) (Amendment) Regulations 2004,

These regulations remove the requirement for businesses to obtain insurance where limited companies employ only their owner and where that employee also owns 50% or more of the issued share capital in the company.

 UK regulation

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Employers’ Liability (Compulsory Insurance) (Amendment) Regulations 2008,

This regulation removes burdens on business by allowing employers to display insurance certificates electronically and abolishes the need to keep insurance policies for 40 years.

 UK regulation

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Employers’ Liability (Compulsory Insurance) Regulations 1998,

These regulations make it compulsory for employers to insure their liability to their employees against injury or disease sustained during employment and to display insurance certificates.

 UK regulation

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Employment Act 2002 (Amendment of Schedules 3, 4 and 5) Order 2007,

These regulations amend the original act that sets out the proceedures that must be followed for resolving employment disputes.

 UK regulation

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Employment and Training Act 1973 (Repeals) Order 1981

This Order terminates certain sections of the Employment and Training Act 1973 which enable the Manpower Services Commission to provide careers service on behalf of a local authority.

 UK regulation

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Employment Protection (Continuity of Employment) (Amendment) Regulations 2001,

These regulations ensure that an employee’s continuity of employment is not broken and lost in the event they have been dismissed and a successful arbitration process results in their reinstatement/ re-employment.

 UK regulation

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Employment Protection (Continuity of Employment) Regulations 1996

These regulations ensure that an employee’s continuity of employment is not broken and lost in the event they have been dismissed and reinstated as a result of making a successful claim under the Disability Discrimination Act 1995.

 UK regulation

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Employment Protection (Offshore Employment) (Amendment) Order 1977

These amendments to employment protection regulations are to ensure employees working offshore have rights such as maternity pay and an itemised pay statement

 UK regulation

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Employment Protection (Offshore Employment) (Amendment) Order 1981

This regulation extends the scope of the Employment Protection (Offshore Employment) Order 1976 to include any activities connected with the exploration or exploitation of the Frigg Gas Field if the employer is a UK company, futher provisons of the Employment Protection Act 1975 and substantive provisions of the Employment Act 1980.

 UK regulation

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Employment Protection (Offshore Employment) (Amendment) Order 1984

Further amendments to offshore workers rights and protection to include changes brought in by the Employment Act 1982.

 UK regulation

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Employment Protection (Offshore Employment) Order 1976,

Regulation to ensure that employment law applies to people working in British territorial waters and designated areas of the Continental Shelf

 UK regulation

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Employment Relations (Offshore Employment) Order 2000

This regulation ensures that the same trade union and industrial relations rules apply in cases of offshore working.

 UK regulation

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Employment Rights Act 1996 (Application of Section 80B to Adoption Overseas) Regulations 2003

Regulations make provisions relating to paternity leave in the event where a child is adopted from abroad

 UK regulation

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Employment Rights Act 1996 (Application of Section 80BB to Adoptions from Overseas) Regulations 2010

These regulations make provisions relating to paternity leave in the event where a child is adopted from abroad

 UK regulation

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Fixed-term Employees (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2002,

These regulations give fixed term employees the right not to be treated less favourably than a similar permanent employee.

 EU regulation

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Flexible Working (Eligibility, Complaints and Remedies) (Amendment) Regulations 2006

These regulations widen the scope of the statutory right for employees to request flexible working which previously applied to carers of children under 6 or disabled children under 18, to cover employees who care for certain adults.

 UK regulation

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Flexible Working (Eligibility, Complaints and Remedies) (Amendment) Regulations 2007

These regulations supplement the 2006 Regulations and insert two further categories of adult in the definition of “relative” which had been intended to be included in the 2006 Regulations

 UK regulation

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Flexible Working (Eligibility, Complaints and Remedies) Regulations 2002

These regulations set out the parameters for complaints, compensation and disciplinary in relation to the flexible working regulations.

 UK regulation

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Flexible Working (Procedural Requirements) Regulations 2002

These regulations specify how an employer must deal with a request from an employee to work flexibly

 UK regulation

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Information and Consultation of Employees Regulations 2004

These regulations establish the right for employees to be informed and consulted about issues affecting the business for which they work.

 EU regulation

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Maternity Allowance and Statutory Maternity Pay Regulations 1994,

Amendments to maternity allowance and statutory maternity pay (SMP), for example, changing the weekly rate of maternity allowance and the start date for SMP – enabling women to choose the week they want their pay to begin.

 EU regulation

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Maternity and Parental Leave (Amendment) Regulations 2001

These regulations set out the statutory entitlements to maternity and parental leave and the processes which employers and employees must follow.

 EU regulation

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Maternity and Parental Leave (Amendment) Regulations 2002

These regulations set out the statutory entitlements to maternity and parental leave and the processes which employers and employees must follow.

 UK regulation

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Maternity and Parental Leave etc and the Paternity and Adoption Leave (Amendment) Regulations 2006

These regulations set out the statutory entitlements to maternity and parental leave and the processes which employers and employees must follow.

 EU regulation

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Maternity and Parental Leave etc and the Paternity and Adoption Leave (Amendment) Regulations 2008

These regulations set out the statutory entitlements to maternity and parental leave and the processes which employers and employees must follow.

 EU regulation

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Maternity and Parental Leave etc Regulations 1999

These regulations set out the statutory entitlements to maternity and parental leave and the processes which employers and employees must follow.

 UK regulation

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Maternity Pay and Maternity Allowance (Transitional) Regulations 1987,

Transitional regulations associated with the introduction of Statutory Maternity Pay and Maternity Allowance

 UK regulation

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Ordinary Statutory Paternity Pay (Adoption), Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (Adoption) and Statutory Adoption Pay (Adoptions from Overseas) (Persons Abroad and Mariners) Regulations 2010

These regulations set out how Additional and Ordinary Statutory Paternity Pay and Statutory Adoption Pay apply to mariners or those working abroad who adopt a child from overseas.

 UK regulation

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Part-time Workers (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2000 (Amendment) Regulations 2002,

These regulations remove the distinction between fixed-term and permanent contract workers for the purpose of ascertaining what are different types of contract. Also removes limits that can be awarded in the case of claims for access to occupational pension schemes.

 EU regulation

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Part-time Workers (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2000,

These regulations give part-time workers the right not to be treated less favourably than a similar full time worker unless it can be justified.

 EU regulation

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Part-time Workers (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2001,

These regulations ensure that part time workers are not treated differently to full time workers when negotiating compromise agreements to leave an employer

 UK regulation

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Paternity and Adoption Leave (Adoption from Overseas) Regulations 2003

These regulations set out the statutory entitlements to paternity and adoption leave when a child is adopted from overseas and the processes which employers and employees must follow.

 UK regulation

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Paternity and Adoption Leave Regulations 2002

These regulations set out the statutory entitlements to paternity and adoption leave and the processes which employers and employees must follow.

 UK regulation

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Public Interest Disclosure (Prescribed Persons) (Amendment) Order 2003

This order amends the Public Interest Disclosure (Prescribed Persons) Order 1999 that protects whistleblowers from detrimental treatment by their employer.

 UK regulation

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Reserve Forces (Safeguard of Employment) Act 1985

This legislation provides protection to reservists in returning to their employment following a period of active service for the UK’s armed forces.

 UK regulation

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Right to Time Off for Study or Training Regulations 2001

These regulations set out that where an employee between the ages of 16-17 years old, has not achieved a level 2 qualification they have the right to time off for study

 UK regulation

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Smoke-free (Exemptions and Vehicles) Regulations 2007

This regulations specify the circumstances where smoke-free legislation does not apply to vehicles used for work

 UK regulation

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Statutory Maternity Pay (Compensation of Employers) Amendment Regulations 2002,

This regulation amends the meaning of ‘small employers’ to cover employers whose National Insurance Contributions paid in the previous tax year do not exceed £40000.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Maternity Pay (Compensation of Employers) Amendment Regulations 2003,

Regulations make amendments to the process for employers to recover statutory maternity pay from the Government.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Maternity Pay (Compensation of Employers) Amendment Regulations 2004,

This regulation amends the meaning of ‘small employers’ to cover employers with National Insurance contributions paid in the previous tax year of £45000 (raised from £40000).

 UK regulation

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Statutory Maternity Pay (Compensation of Employers) and Miscellaneous Amendment Regulations 1994,

This amendment changes the amount of Statutory Maternity Pay that employers can reclaim from the Government.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Maternity Pay (General) (Modification and Amendment) Regulations 2000,

This regulation sets the rules for when women are dismissed or whose employment is terminated before the week they would qualify for maternity pay.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Maternity Pay (General) Amendment Regulations 1988,

Amendments to the rules on how women qualify for statutory maternity pay if their employment is ended.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Maternity Pay (General) Amendment Regulations 1990,

Amendments to regulation to enable women who are seasonal workers to qualify for maternity pay.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Maternity Pay (General) Amendment Regulations 1996,

This amendment introduces a specific change that means a woman who receives a backdated pay award during her maternity leave period, the employer has to recalculate Statutory Maternity Pay entitlement, if the additional pay affects her entitlement to SMP.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Maternity Pay (General) and Statutory Sick Pay (General) (Amendment) Regulations 2001,

These amendments make it illegal for employers to not comply with statutory sick pay and statutory maternity pay rules.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Maternity Pay (General) Regulations 1986,

These regulations set the rules for Statutory Maternity Pay, including whether women qualify for the payment and how employers should make those payments.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Maternity Pay (Medical Evidence) Regulations 1987

Regulations covering the medical evidence required to prove a woman is pregnant and her expected week of childbirth

 UK regulation

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Statutory Maternity Pay, Social Security (Maternity Allowance) and Social Security (Overlapping Benefits) (Amendment) Regulations 2006,

Regulations that make changes to maternity pay, including increasing the payment period to 39 weeks, and allows payments of SMP to be paid for part weeks.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Paternity Pay (Adoption) and Statutory Adoption Pay (Adoptions from Overseas) (Administration) Regulations 2003

These regulations apply the process for employers to reclaim amounts of Statutory Paternity Pay or Statutory Adoption Pay which they have paid to their employees for overseas adoption cases.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Paternity Pay (Adoption) and Statutory Adoption Pay (Adoptions from Overseas) (No 2) Regulations 2003

These regulations set out details such as the eligibility requirements and notice an employee must give in order to receive Statutory Paternity Pay or Statutory Adoption when adopting a child from overseas.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Paternity Pay and Statutory Adoption Pay (Administration) Regulations 2002

These regulations set out how employers can reclaim amounts of Statutory Paternity Pay or Statutory Adoption Pay which they have paid to their employees.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Paternity Pay and Statutory Adoption Pay (Amendment) Regulations 2004

These regulations set out the statutory entitlements to maternity and parental leave and the processes which employers and employees must follow.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Paternity Pay and Statutory Adoption Pay (General) and the Statutory Paternity Pay and Statutory Adoption Pay (Weekly Rates) (Amendment) Regulations 2006

These regulations set out the statutory entitlements to maternity and parental leave and the processes which employers and employees must follow.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Paternity Pay and Statutory Adoption Pay (General) Regulations 2002

These regulations set out the statutory entitlements to maternity and parental leave and the processes which employers and employees must follow.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Paternity Pay and Statutory Adoption Pay (Weekly Rates) (Amendment) Regulations 2004

These regulations set out the statutory entitlements to maternity and parental leave and the processes which employers and employees must follow.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Paternity Pay and Statutory Adoption Pay (Weekly Rates) Regulations 2002 – as amended

These regulations set out details such as the eligibility requirements and notice an employee must give in order to receive Statutory Paternity Pay or Statutory Adoption Pay.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Sick Pay (General) (Amendment) (Transitional) Regulations 1986,

This regulation brings in changes to sick pay, that enable two periods of sickness to be treated as one if the gap between them was less than a certain amount of weeks

 UK regulation

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Statutory Sick Pay (General) (Amendment) Regulations 1986

Amendments that change the rules on how periods of sickness are calculated and paid for and introduces a maximum number of years sick pay can run for.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Sick Pay (General) (Amendment) Regulations 2008,

Amends the information that employers need to provide to their employees who are sick to enable them to claim benefits. The changes also mean a new employer does not need to take into account sick pay of an employee with a previous employer when calculating payments.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Sick Pay (General) Amendment (No 2) Regulations 1987,

Amendments that introduce periods for which pregnant women are not entitled to SSP, and amending the information employers are required to provide to their employee.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Sick Pay (General) Amendment Regulations 1984,

These amendments bring in changes to the time limit by which an employee must inform their employer of sickness.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Sick Pay (General) Amendment Regulations 1985,

Amendments that allow for certain specified days to no longer be treated as qualifying days for statutory sick pay

 UK regulation

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Statutory Sick Pay (General) Amendment Regulations 1987,

Regulations setting out the circumstances when liability to pay statutory sick pay lies with the Secretary of State rather than an employer, where an employer becomes insolvent.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Sick Pay (General) Amendment Regulations 1996,

Regulations amend the record keeping of Statutory Sick Pay.(reg 13) Where an employer makes a contractual payment to his employee which is equal to or exceeds the amount of SSP payable, it shall not be treated as a payment of SSP for record keeping.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Sick Pay (General) Regulations 1982,

Regulations underpinning the provision of Statutory Sick Pay . For examjple, entitlements, time limits, record keeping, questions arising and definitions.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Sick Pay (Medical Evidence) Regulations 1985,

Regulations covering the medical evidence related to a claim for Statutory Sick Pay

 UK regulation

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Statutory Sick Pay and Statutory Maternity Pay (Decisions) Regulations 1999,

Regulations related to the handling of disputes regarding entitlement to statutory sick pay and statutory maternity pay.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Sick Pay Percentage Threshold Order 1995 (Consequential) Regulations 1995,

Consequential regulations.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Sick Pay Percentage Threshold Order 1995,

This order covers details of the circumstances when employers can recover some or all of the statutory sick pay they have paid to their employee(s).

 UK regulation

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Statutory Sick Pay (Mariners, Airman and Persons Abroad) Regulations 1982

These Regulations apply rules of Statutory Sick Pay to mariners, airmen, persons abroad and persons employed in operations on the Continental Shelf.

 UK regulation

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Suspension from Work (on Maternity Grounds) Order 1994,

The Employment Rights Act provides that a woman will be entitled to be offered alternative work or to be paid her usual pay if she cannot continue her job because she is pregnant. These regulations set out the requirements or recommendations where this would apply, for example the job could be unsafe for a pregnant woman to do.

 EU regulation

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Suspension from Work on Maternity Grounds (Merchant Shipping and Fishing Vessels) Order 1998,

As above but relating to the shipping industry

 EU regulation

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Telecommunications (Lawful Business Practice) (Interception of Communications) Regulations 2000

The Lawful Business Practice Regulations allow interception of any communications (whether inside or outside the organisation) so long as whoever controls the communications system has consented.
However, organisations that do this must make people aware that their calls/emails may be monitored.

 EU regulation

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The Statutory Maternity Pay (Compensationof Employers) Amendment Regulations 2003

Regulations that amend rules on funding of employers liablity, advance funding, payments to the board, and payments by the board.

 UK regulation

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Statutory Maternity Pay (Persons Abroad and Mariners) Regulations 1987

These Regulations provide for statutory maternity pay in relation to persons abroad, women who work as mariners or women who work on the continental shelf.

 UK regulation

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TICE Amendment Regs 2010

These regulations amend the TICE (Transnational Information and Consultation of Employees) 1999 Regulations to take account of changes to the law at European level

 UK regulation

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Time Off for Public Duties (No 2) Order 2000

This Order modifies Section 50(9) of the Employment Rights Act to add the General Teaching Council for England and the General Teaching Council for Wales to the list of relevant educational bodies. These count as organisations people can request time off from their employer to serve as volunteers.

 UK regulation

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Time Off for Public Duties (Parent Councils) Order 2007

This order amends Section 50 (9) (d) of the Employment Rights Act 1996 to substitute the wording “parent councils” for “school boards”.

 UK regulation

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Time Off for Public Duties Order 2000

This order adds Scottish water and sewerage authorities and Water Industry Consultative Committies to the list of bodies specified in the Employment Rights Act 1996 as organisations an employee can take time off during working hours in order to attend meetings or for other purposes connected with the fuctions of the body.

 UK regulation

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Training for Work (Miscellaneous Provisions) Order 1995,

 UK regulation

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Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) (Greater London Authority) Order 2000

These regulations specifically deal with protecting an employee’s terms and conditions when transfering their employment to the Greater London Authority when it was created in 1999

 UK regulation

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Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) (Rent Officer Service) Regulations 1999

These regulations protect the terms and conditions of employees providing clerical and administrative assistance to rent officers when responsibility moved from local authorities to the Secretary of State of DTI in 1999

 UK regulation

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Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) (Transfer to OFCOM) Regulations 2003

As above but relate to staff transferring from the Broadcasting Standards Commission, the Radio Authority, the Radiocommunications Agency and the Director General of Telecommunications with the formation of OFCOM under the 2003 Communications Act

 UK regulation

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Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 2006

Regulations implementing European Commission Acquired Rights Directive, designed to safeguard employees’ rights where the business, part of a business or a service provision in which they are engaged in changes hands. They also benefit employers by smoothing the process of necessary business restructuring and public sector modernisation.

 EU regulation

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Transnational Information and Consultation of Employees Regulations 1999

Regulations which establish the right for employees of multinational businesses to be informed and consulted about transnational issues affecting the business

 EU regulation

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Working Time (Amendment No 2) Regulations 2006

An EU based health and safety law covering hours at work, annual leave entitlements, rest break provisions and night working. This is an amendment to the original 1998 regulations to clarify offshore work

 EU regulation

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Working Time (Amendment) Regulations 2001

As above, this is an amendment to the original 1998 regulations to remove an incompatible qualifying period following an ECJ judgement.

 EU regulation

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Working Time (Amendment) Regulations 2002

As above, this amends the 1998 regulation so they are compliant with 1994 young people at work directive.

 EU regulation

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Working Time (Amendment) Regulations 2003

As above, this amends the 1998 regulation so that it is compliant with the 2000 EU Working Time Directive.

 EU regulation

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Working Time (Amendment) Regulations 2007

As above, this is an amendment to the original 1998 regulations to increase amout of annual leave from 4 weeks to 5.6 weeks.

 UK regulation

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Working Time Regulations 1998

This regulation implements the EU Working Time Directive (1993)

 EU regulation

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Working Time Regulations 1998 (Amendment) Regulations 2004

Amendment to the original 1998 regulations to extend the definition of a lawyer.

 UK regulation

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Working Time Regulations 1999

Amending the original 1998 regulations to make record keeping less prescriptive for employers whose staff sign the optout of the working time directive

 EU regulation

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National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999

This regulation sets detailed rules on operation of the National Minimum Wage (NMW)

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage (Increase in Development Rate for Young Workers) Regulations 2000

This regulation increases NMW rates for workers aged between 18 and 22

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999 (Amendment) Regulations 2000

This regulation increases NMW rates and amends provisions on apprentices, time work and salaried hours work

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999 (Amendment) Regulations 2001

This regulation corrects an unintended anomaly by bringing agency & home workers within scope of exclusion for NMW for trainees on Government training schemes

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999 (Amendment)(No 2) Regulations 2001

This regulation increases NMW rates and makes changes to definitions of “training”

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999 (Amendment) Regulations 2002

This regulation increases the NMW rates and clarifies which NMW rate applies in a particular pay reference period

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999 (Amendment) Regulations 2003

This regulation increases minimum hourly rate and changes way the accommodation offset is calculated

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999 (Amendment) Regulations 2004

This regulation changes the way in which NMW is calculated for output workers

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999 (Amendment)(No.2) Regulations 2004

This regulation increases NMW rates and amends list of apprenticeship schemes and record keeping requirements for employers of workers under fair piece rates

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999 (Amendment) Regulations 2005

This regulation increases NMW rates and exempts those in the Leonardo da Vinci Programme from the NMW

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999 (Amendment) Regulations 2006

This regulation increases NMW rates and makes it clear that a worker who does not qualify for the NMW is not entitled to the youth rates

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999 (Amendment) Regulations 2007

This regulation increases NMW rates, exempts further categories of work experience from the NMW and changes accommodation offset rules for local authorities and registered social landlords

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999 (Amendment) Regulations 2008

This regulation increases NMW rates and makes provision for people on Government employment programmes

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999 (Amendment) Regulations 2009

This regulation increases NMW rates, exempts workers on two EU Lifelong Learning Programmes from the NMW and provides that tips do not count as pay for NMW purposes.

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage Regulations 1999 (Amendment) Regulations 2010

This regulation increases NMW rates and provides for a new apprentice minimum wage.

 UK regulation

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National Minimum Wage (Amendment) (No2) Regulations 2010

This regulation provides that payments from an employer for travelling expenses that are tax deductible do not count towards the NMW

 UK regulation

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The European Public Limited-Liability Company (Employee Involvement) (Great Britain) Regulations 2009

These regulations seek to safeguard employees’ rights to employee involvement in a European Public Limited Liability Company

 EU regulation

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The European Cooperative Society (Involvement of Employees) Regulations 2006

These regulations seek to safeguard employees’ rights to employee involvement in a European Cooperative Society

 EU regulation

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The Education (Student Loans) (Repayment) Regulations 2009

These regulations govern repayments of student loans by borrowers who have taken out income-contingent repayment loans for courses which began any time during or after September 1998

 UK regulation

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The Education (Student Loans) (Repayment) Regulations 2009 (Ammendment 2010)

The amendments serve to ensure that the student loan repayment system remains aligned with Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs
(HMRC) Self Assessment and Pay As You Earn (PAYE) processes which are used to collect student loans. They also make provision for student loans to be excluded from Individual Voluntary Arrangements

 UK regulation

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The Education (Student Loans) (Repayment) (Amendment) Regulations 2011

These amendments change the time limited threshold for re-payment of student loans and introduce new penalties placed on employers if they do not pay tax or file returns on time.

 UK regulation

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The Right to Request Time to Train Regulations 2010

The Right allows employees to ask for time to train for accredited and unaccredited training to help them develop skills relevant to their job, workplace or business. The Government announced in March 2011 the Right, which currently only applies in businesses with 250 or more staff, would not be extended to SMEs. Formal evaluation of the Right will take place in April 2015, enabling an evidence based decision on whether the right should remain as it is, be extended or repealed. Comments received as part of the Red Tape Challenge will inform the evaluation.

 UK regulation

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Tell us what you think should happen to these regulations and why, being specific where possible:

424 responses to Managing staff

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    Anita said on October 17, 2011 at 8:19 am

    I think that a new mum should be allowed as much time off as possible to bring up and bond with her new baby and get use to life with a person who needs someone to do for them. it can take some time to get into a routeing with a new baby even if you have other children

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    Caroline Murphy said on October 17, 2011 at 7:38 am

    Current Maternity legislation should remain the same. Mothers are under enough pressure to return to work without added financial pressure being enforced on them. I just feel that working people in general are constantly punished while the lazy benefit cheats are allowed to do as they please at the expense of tax payers. As it stands, Working Tax Credit changes make life very difficult for working parents, and changing maternity legislation wouldn’t help matters at all. Instead of reviewing employment law, the government should review other laws which have so far failed to provide justice for honest people.

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    rachel skinner said on October 16, 2011 at 10:57 pm

    I think that working people with caring commitments, would be more committed to thier employer, if they feel that thier employer recognises that there is more to life than a mimimum wage job. In my experience with a major supermarket, quite a few of my colleages would be no worse off financially if they were living on benefits, and indeed would have a less complicated life. My employer, seems to make people jump through hoops and takes its time answering the majority of enquiries about changes to employment contracts. Most of the senior individuals in my workplace have either the financial resources to pay for assistance with care, or indeed no specific responsibilities of supplying care. In this fast moving age of change, an employees domestic responsibilitiers can alter with little warning.

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    Janna Kolodziejska said on October 16, 2011 at 8:52 pm

    Should not cut. If some woman wants came back early, they have a choice. I would like stay with my baby long, because it needs mother but I would like came back to my work after all.

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    Sarida said on October 16, 2011 at 8:22 pm

    Should Not be cut. Lenght is too short already. Money are too small as well…

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    Ajamama Kebbeh said on October 16, 2011 at 8:20 pm

    I think is very wrong for the government to think of reducing the leght of maternity leave mothers. They need to spend more with their babies and take good care of them. Are they not really, honestly thinking about babies and mothers having good time together. I just pray they don’t reduce it at all. If they cannot increase it please, please, please let them leave it like that.Thanks

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    paul dyson said on October 16, 2011 at 7:37 pm

    Surely putting restrictions on maternity leave will put the mother and child at greater risk.I totally agree with some of the other comments people have made primarily the one about people having child after child whilst on benefits and expecting the government to pay for raising their children.It is the working man and woman who pay their taxes week in and week out which enables the people on benefits to bring up their children.If the government were to stop deducting the part of our taxes which goes to people on benefits then thier might not be quite so much pressure on the working adults when they decide they want to start a family

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    Kate Corps said on October 16, 2011 at 7:24 pm

    Reducing or getting rid of maternity leave is rediculas. As it is, this country does not do enough to support its new mothers, particulary compared to other countries in the EU. No, no, no!

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    Gareth John Partington said on October 16, 2011 at 6:50 pm

    There have been threats to some nightshift workers to be dragged onto dayshift for whatever reason. Some of the people I work with work nights because their wife works nights elsewhere. The bosses just don’t care about staff where I work and put it down as being “their problem not the company’s” I’m trying to strengthen the union where I work starting by getting more members.

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    Tahiri Tatiana Koffi said on October 16, 2011 at 6:41 pm

    I thing each of us should play it part so that women keep having the righ to get maternity pay and leave . this can be done by signing petitions.

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    ricky andrews said on October 16, 2011 at 6:17 pm

    leave as they are!

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    sarabjit said on October 16, 2011 at 5:50 pm

    we need better society which can only come if we have proper parenting at home. if someone has family and working then he or she will be given flexibility of hours at work regardless the age of children.

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    Vicki Birch said on October 16, 2011 at 5:45 pm

    I am a working Mum, and my partner is a stay at home Dad to our 1 year old. If you scrap the current maternity pay legislation or reduce it, we would be unable to have another child. We should not be punished, when if neither of us worked we would get thousands in benefits. Please ensure that you do not penalise those who are from families who work and look after their own children.

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    Graham Morfoot said on October 16, 2011 at 5:14 pm

    No less, more needed.

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    tracy said on October 16, 2011 at 4:41 pm

    scrapping the current rights of the pregnant woman & the new parent would be pushing this country back to days where women had no rights! trying to juggle a house, a family & a job is hard enough for any woman without the worries of how she is going to put food on the table, how she is going to pay the bills & who she is going to leave her baby with as it is! i already have 4 children & am 6 months pregnant with my 5th, working is a real struggle at the moment due to the type of job i have & instead of working right up to the end like i did with the others, im taking my maternity leave at 31 weeks because i am physically struggling. to scrap the laws already in place would mean that i would be unable to do this.
    does this government want this country like a 3rd world country with women dropping their babies during working hours, getting back up & then working with babies strapped to their backs??? im not sexist but come on, were getting a bad enough deal of it as it is, half the people who make these laws were born with a silver spoon in their mouth & had a nanny!

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      ayub said on October 16, 2011 at 5:20 pm

      flexible is the most inportant thing as worker,

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    linda kerr said on October 16, 2011 at 3:51 pm

    i think employers should be more considerate to employees as regards family commitments,we do have other responsabilities besides work .

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    Mrs S Talbot-Moon said on October 16, 2011 at 3:42 pm

    I agree with the current SMP and leave… getting rid of it would make new parents and children suffer. It is hard enough as it is to cope on £128 a week in today’s world but it is better than nothing. New mothers need all the support they can get to give children the best posible start in life! I am currently 5 months pregnant and if there were no SMP there is no way my husband and I would be able to suppport our family, it would mean i would have to return to work a lot earlier, loose valuable time with my new born and be unable to breastfeed.

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    Ingrid Carr said on October 16, 2011 at 3:36 pm

    Maternity pay and conditions should remain for many reasons ie family is important for a well rounded and balanced worker and the next generation is the worker of the future. Also the minimum wage should be increased, the cost of living is!

    Comment Tags: Maternity Pay

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    angela jansons said on October 16, 2011 at 3:35 pm

    flexiable working should be available to all. I asked if i could have saturdays of =f to enable me to look after my mother who has dementia, this was refused only allowing me to have one in three off . my mother has now had to go into care because of this something i never wanted to happen

    Comment Tags: farrah

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    Teresa Sankey said on October 16, 2011 at 3:33 pm

    I feel that although flexible work can invaluable for some legislation should be changed so that people have a definite work rota with at least three weeks notice. I am one of many that have to work flexible hours but unfortuantley, the company I work for frequently let me know my working hours on a Thursday or Friday what they will be for the following week. I work full-time so this means it is very difficult to have any kind of personal life outside of work. I would love it if some kind of legislation came in protecting the worker from this kind of exploitation.

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